Gamma Dosimetry Using Some Dyes in Organic Solvents Solutions at 295 and 77 K

  • A L Melendez-Lopez Institute of Nuclear Sciences, National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM), PO Box 70-543, 04510 Mexico City, Mexico; Master’s and PhD Program in Chemical Sciences, National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM), PO Box 70-543, 04510 Mexico City, Mexico
  • A Paredes-Arriaga Institute of Nuclear Sciences, National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM), PO Box 70-543, 04510 Mexico City, Mexico
  • J Cruz-Castaneda Institute of Nuclear Sciences, National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM), PO Box 70-543, 04510 Mexico City, Mexico; Master’s and PhD Program in Chemical Sciences, National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM), PO Box 70-543, 04510 Mexico City, Mexico
  • A Negron-Mendoza Institute of Nuclear Sciences, National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM), PO Box 70-543, 04510 Mexico City, Mexico
  • S Ramos-Bernal Institute of Nuclear Sciences, National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM), PO Box 70-543, 04510 Mexico City, Mexico
  • M Colin-Garcia Institute of Geology, National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM)
  • A Heredia Institute of Nuclear Sciences, National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM), PO Box 70-543, 04510 Mexico City, Mexico
Keywords: dyes, linearity dose -response, chemical dosimeter, low temperatures

Abstract

The aim of this work is to study the behavior under irradiation of different dyes (green malachite, methyl orange, red cresol, and bromothymol blue) in organic solvents (acetone and methanol) at different gamma doses and different temperatures to propose them as possible dosimeters for low-temperature applications. For this purpose, organic dissolutions were irradiated with gamma rays in the kiloGray (kGy) range at 77 and 295 K, and the color bleaching of the solutions was followed spectrophotometrically (UV-Vis range). The response curves at different temperatures show the linear range interval from 10 to 40 kGy with correlation coefficients of 0.999 and 0.998 for some systems. This is the main reason to continue carrying out studies that allow the proposal of these systems as chemical dosimeters.

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Published
2018-08-06
How to Cite
A L Melendez-Lopez, A Paredes-Arriaga, J Cruz-Castaneda, A Negron-Mendoza, S Ramos-Bernal, M Colin-Garcia, & A Heredia. (2018). Gamma Dosimetry Using Some Dyes in Organic Solvents Solutions at 295 and 77 K. Journal of Nuclear Physics, Material Sciences, Radiation and Applications, 6(1), 87-92. https://doi.org/10.15415/jnp.2018.61015
Section
Articles