Radiolysis and Thermolysis of Cytosine: Importance in Chemical Evolution

  • J. Cruz-Castañeda Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, UNAM.Cd. Universitaria, A. P. 70-543, 04510 México, D. F. México; Programa de Maestría y Doctorado en Ciencias Químicas, UNAM. Cd. Universitaria, A. P. 70-543, 04510 México, D. F. México
  • A Negron-Mendoza Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, UNAM.Cd. Universitaria, A. P. 70-543, 04510 México, D. F. México
Keywords: gamma radiation, thermolysis, nitrogenous base, chemical evolution, cytosine

Abstract

An important aspect of chemical evolution is the study of the stability of organic molecules with biological significance in primitive conditions, especially in the presence of constant energy sources. An example of sets of biologically important organic compounds is nitrogenous bases. The presence of these compounds in prebiotic environments is very important in forming more complex systems, such as nucleic acids, in which nitrogenous bases are an essential component. The aim of the present work is to study the stability of cytosine, a pyrimidine base, in high-radiation fields or at high temperature and to evaluate its recovery. Our results show that the cytosine (1x10-4 M aqueous solution, oxygen-free) decomposed completely at a dose of 22 kGy, and 25% recovery was obtained with a dose of 7.4 kGy. The analysis of irradiated samples was followed by HPLC, HPLC-mass spectrometry and UV-VIS spectroscopy. The main product in both thermolysis and radiolysis was uracil, formed via a deamination reaction. Uracil is another nitrogenous base with biological significance.

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Published
2016-08-08
How to Cite
J. Cruz-Castañeda, & A Negron-Mendoza. (2016). Radiolysis and Thermolysis of Cytosine: Importance in Chemical Evolution. Journal of Nuclear Physics, Material Sciences, Radiation and Applications, 4(1), 183-190. https://doi.org/10.15415/jnp.2016.41019
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Articles